Guide to living in
ROTHERHITHE

A guide to living in Rotherhithe

Located on a peninsula on the south bank of the River Thames, Rotherhithe has a long and formidable history as a shipping port. Originally known as Redriff, the area is fast becoming a busy and vibrant residential and commuter centre. 

Due to historically forged links between Surrey Docks, Scandinavia and the Baltic, Rotherhithe continues to house a thriving Scandinavian community. There are Finnish and Norwegian churches either side of Rotherhithe Library on Albion Street alongside a hearty mix of Scandinavian-owned cafés, shops and hostels.

“Due to Rotherhithe’s nautical history there are a large number of warehouses available that have been converted into high-end property”

The area has a strong history to explore. It was the location from where one of the world’s most famous ships, the Mayflower, sailed to Southampton before its voyage to America. Furthermore, as with the rest of the docks, Rotherhithe received an onslaught during the blitz. 

Green spaces may not be overly common around London’s dockside but Rotherhithe benefits from the presence of Stave Hill Ecological Park. An artificial mound on reclaimed land, the park has some breathtaking views over the docks and particularly of Canary Wharf. 

Due to Rotherhithe’s nautical history there are a large number of warehouses available that have been converted into high-end property. On top of this, a variety of new-build apartment developments with stunning riverside views have received a lot of attention from London’s in crowd. The property is spectrum is completed by a range of original Georgian properties, formerly homes to local dock workers.

Schools

Nursery: Global Kids

Eating & Drinking

Simplicity lives up to its name, but in a positive sense. A regularly changing, good value menu has won this restaurant a dedicated legion of repeat customers. Although a bit of a tourist magnet, The Mayflower Pub impressively dates back to 1620, and its décor and waterside terrace are top-class features worthy of a visit alone.

We Recommend…

Formerly known as the Brunel Engine House, Brunel Museum is part of the infrastructure of the Thames Tunnel. Built by the great Sir Marc Isambard Brunel, the museum takes part in Open House London every year and now has dedicated exhibition and performance space.

Travelling to Rotherhithe

Rotherhithe has been part of the London Overground network since 2010, providing good links to the rest of the capital. Alternatively, the Jubilee Line services from neighbouring Canada Water often come in handy for commuters. There is a healthy selection of buses and of course, the Rotherhithe Tunnel for road users.

Local Atkinson McLeod office